weekly link roundup, september 2.

This week: mostly local theatre, plus a byline of mine.

This weekend I’m seeing CommUnity Arts Festival’s first two dance concerts to benefit a local dancer who is a survivor of gun violence, and Rebels and Misfits’ Uncle Vanya – Valiantly Accepting Next Year’s Agony, a fully immersive adaptation of the Chekov classic.

I finally broke down and dropped the $60 on a bottle of green chartreuse, so Last Words will be the Labor Day libation I partake in while devoting my rare two days off in a row to an apartment deep clean. They are as beautiful as they are delicious.

weekly link roundup, july 29.

A link roundup for learning and healing: the past few days have been heavy and gruesome. This week I kept saying to myself “this is the best thing I’ve read in weeks” and then days or hours later thinking the same thing all over again.

I have a very strong sense of there being troves of critical insight and compassion and nuance for me to learn from many of the people these articles are written by and about. There is also some very charming and funny stuff here.

On Thursday I picked up Annie Baker’s The Vermont Plays, the first of several works by contemporary playwrights that I have convinced the St. Louis Public Library to purchase for their collection. I was very excited.

Image description: a selfie showing me holding up a book of Annie Baker’s plays near my face. I have on aviator glasses, have philtrum and septum piercings, have a light blonde buzzcut, and my mouth is open. The book has a white cover featuring a multicolored line drawing of a snowflake.

Lord Byron’s “Fare Thee Well,” or “I Just Think It’s Funny How” by Mallory Ortberg, The Toast.

The Toast was back for a single day. It is still lovely. The Tosties are still the best people in the world. Mallory is still hilarious. Water is still wet.

The Fallout by Lacy M. Johnson, Guernica.

Living in St. Louis feels like living in a haunted house sometimes. The Weldon Springs nuclear site is literally just across the street from the psychiatric hospital where I spent 41 days last spring. My sense of the haunted-ness of the city certainly pales in comparison to the pain and wisdom of the people who have spent lifetimes and generations with these ghosts, or the people who wrestled with them before they were ever spoken about by people outside their family or neighborhood. The people in this article are regular people – not professional scientists or social service agencies or publicly funded projects – doing work that should be the responsibility of state and federal governments, who have consistently failed to act, to care for and protect their families and neighbors. We have a lot to learn from them.

I Don’t Want to Watch Slavery Fan Fiction by Roxane Gay, The New York Times.

I don’t think anything I can say about this would add anything to it; it is that good. Roxane Gay is a genius and her work constantly challenges and excites me, but you already know that.

If you missed it, on Tuesday I highlighted the St. Louis theatre I am most excited about seeing over the coming months.

Continue reading “weekly link roundup, july 29.”

weekly link roundup, july 22.

Following the grand tradition of The Hairpin, Autostraddle, and The Toast, I bring you the Rad Cat Lady weekly link roundup, volume one. Every weekend I’ll be posting links to and (this time, extremely limited) thoughts about what I’m reading, watching, and texting to my best friend.

Ahead: xenophobia in famously international south St. Louis, a gay video game (gayme?) that might make me hate the format a little less, manspreading at the theatre, and more.

Content warning: the last link on this list includes non-graphic descriptions of a young girl receiving unwanted sexual pictures and messages from a classmate.

Trip to Puerto Rico! by Karalyn Grimes, Envirofemme.

This is the most recent post on an also-recently-revived blog by my fellow former precocious Unitarian Universalist teen/current cool young adult getting it together, Karalyn. They are consistently very thoughtful and smart, and write compellingly about environmental justice, a topic I can easily understand on an intellectual but have trouble getting fired up about wholeheartedly. This post takes a look at their recent vacation in Puerto Rico both on a personal and political level.

Sign at South Grand eatery suggests bigotry from city inspector, but dispute is resolved by Joe Holleman,  St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

For an incredibly busy and hot week, I drove by this sign in the window of Sheesh, a Turkish restaurant on South Grand Blvd in St. Louis city, without ever catching the stoplight at the right time to slow down and read it, so by the time it was taken down I had still only caught “go back to our country” and “we need help.” From the Dispatch’s reporting, it sounds like all parties involved are hesitant to say much more than the sign did, but I’m seriously curious to see how this plays out. This part of the city is actively gentrifying and also lauded for its dense and diverse international presence.

‘Look at this gay boat’: Creationist’s use of ‘God’s rainbow’ colors for Ark park lighting gets hilariously mocked by David Ferguson, Raw Story.

Really, just look at this gay boat.

Continue reading “weekly link roundup, july 22.”